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Your Call

Your Call

‘Full of glorious examples of caller wisdom [with] laugh-out-loud anecdotes’ Allison Pearson

Having taken over 25,000 listener calls on his BBC Radio 2 lunchtime show, Jeremy Vine decided it was time to take stock of the wisdom his listeners have imparted over the airwaves. And it is clearer than ever before that caller wisdom is far more valuable than most of what we hear from ‘the experts’. The voice of the so-called ‘ordinary person’ – totally unvarnished and unspun – turns out to be not so ordinary after all.

These moments of truth could not have come at a more pertinent time – with world politics, war and Brexit in the fray. And it always helps to make people laugh. This is his hilarious account of lessons learnt from listeners, life and Len Goodman by way of musings on everything including love, lollipop ladies and poisonous plants.
Young Stalin

Young Stalin

Winner of the Costa Biography Award

What makes a Stalin? Was he a Tsarist agent or Lenin’s bandit? Was he to blame for his wife’s death? When did the killing start?

Based on revelatory research, here is the thrilling story of how a charismatic cobbler’s son became a student priest, romantic poet, prolific lover, gangster mastermind and murderous revolutionary. Culminating in the 1917 revolution, Simon Sebag Montefiore’s bestselling biography radically alters our understanding of the gifted politician and fanatical Marxist who shaped the Soviet empire in his own brutal image. This is the story of how Stalin became Stalin.
Young Mandela

Young Mandela

Ruthless revolutionary; passionate womaniser; activist; hothead. Meet the young Mandela.

Nelson Mandela has been mythologised as a flawless hero of the liberation struggle. But how exactly did his early life shape the triumphs to come? This book goes behind the myth to find the man who people have forgotten or never knew – Young Mandela, the committed freedom fighter, who left his wife and children behind to go on the run from the police in the early 1960s. But his historic achievements came at a heavy price and David James Smith graphically describes the emotional turmoil Mandela left in his wake.

After meticulous research, and taking a lead from Mandela’s trusted circle, the author discovers much that is new, surprising, and sometimes shocking that will enhance our understanding of the world’s elder statesman. For the first time, we have evidence of a specific personal motivation for Mandela’s fight against apartheid, and this book sheds light on the significant extent to which Mandela relied on white activists – a part of South African history the ANC has ignored or tried to bury. Sanctified, lionised, it turns out that Mandela is a human being after all, only too aware of his flaws and shortcomings. With unique access to people and papers, culminating in a meeting with Mandela himself, Smith has written the single most important contribution to our knowledge of this global icon.
Young Henry

Young Henry

Compelling account of the first 35 years of a magnificent and ruthless monarch.

Henry became the unexpected heir to the precarious Tudor throne in 1502, after his elder brother Arthur died. He also inherited both his brother’s wardrobe and his wife, the Spanish princess Katherine of Aragon. He became king in April 1509 with many personality traits inherited from his father – the love of magnificence, the rituals of kingship, the excitement of hunting and gambling and the construction of grand new palaces.

After those early glory days of feasting, fun and frolic, the continuing lack of a male Tudor heir runs like a thin line of poison through Henry’s reign. After he fell in love with Anne Boleyn, he gambled everything on her providing him with a son and heir. From that day forward everything changed.

Based on contemporary accounts, Young Henry provides a compelling vision of the splendours, intrigues and tragedies of the royal court, presided over by the ruthless and insecure Henry VIII. With his customary scholarship and narrative verve, Robert Hutchinson provides fresh insights into what drove England’s most famous monarch, and how this happy, playful Renaissance prince was transformed into the tyrant of his later years.
Young Elizabeth

Young Elizabeth

The story of how Elizabeth II became queen.

‘Rich with princess anecdotes… Williams’s book weaves the Second World War, vast social change and the royal upheaval of abdication and celebration of coronation into energised, nostalgic storytelling’ SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

Fascinating insights into Elizabeth’s relationship with her sister also make this a worthwhile, enjoyable read’ DAILY TELEGRAPH

We can hardly imagine a Britain without Elizabeth II on the throne. It seems to be the job she was born for. And yet for much of her early life the young princess did not know the role that her future would hold. She was our accidental Queen.

As a young girl, Elizabeth was among the guests in Westminster Abbey watching her father being crowned, making her the only monarch to have attended a parent’s coronation. Kate Williams explores the sheltered upbringing of the young princess with a gentle father and domineering mother, her complicated relationship with her sister, Princess Margaret, and her dependence on her nanny, Marion ‘Crawfie’ Crawford. She details the profound and devastating impact of the abdication crisis when, at the impressionable age of 11, Elizabeth found her position changed overnight: no longer a minor princess she was now heiress to the throne.

Elizabeth’s determination to share in the struggles of her people marked her out from a young age. Her father initially refused to let her volunteer as a nurse during the Blitz, but relented when she was 18 and allowed her to work as a mechanic and truck driver for the Women’s Auxiliary Territorial Service. It was her forward-thinking approach that ensured that her coronation was televised, against the advice of politicians at the time.

Kate Williams reveals how the 25-year-old young queen carved out a lasting role for herself amid the changes of the 20th century. Her monarchy would be a very different one to that of her parents and grandparents, and its continuing popularity in the 21st century owes much to the intelligence and elusive personality of this remarkable woman.
Wings on My Sleeve

Wings on My Sleeve

The autobiography of one of the greatest pilots in history.

In 1939 Eric Brown was on a University of Edinburgh exchange course in Germany, and the first he knew of the war was when the Gestapo came to arrest him. They released him, not realising he was a pilot in the RAF volunteer reserve: and the rest is history. Eric Brown joined the Fleet Air Arm and went on to be the greatest test pilot in history, flying more different aircraft types than anyone else.

During his lifetime he made a record-breaking 2,407 aircraft carrier landings and survived eleven plane crashes. One of Britain’s few German-speaking airmen, he went to Germany in 1945 to test the Nazi jets, interviewing (among others) Hermann Goering and Hanna Reitsch. He flew the suicidally dangerous Me 163 rocket plane, and tested the first British jets. WINGS ON MY SLEEVE is ‘Winkle’ Brown’s incredible story.
William S. Burroughs

William S. Burroughs

Authoritative biography of cult writer and author of NAKED LUNCH, William Burroughs (1914-1997).

It has been 50 years since Norman Mailer asserted, ‘I think that William Burroughs is the only American novelist living today who may conceivably be possessed by genius.’ This assessment holds true today. No-one since then has taken such risks in their writing, developed such individual radical political ideas, or spanned such a wide range of media – Burroughs has written novels, memoirs, technical manuals and poetry, he has painted, made collages, taken thousands of photographs, made visual scrapbooks, produced hundreds of hours of experimental tapes, acted in movies and recorded more CDs than most rock groups.

Made a cult figure by the publication of NAKED LUNCH, Burroughs was a mentor to the 1960s youth culture. Underground papers referred to him as ‘Uncle Bill’ and he ranked alongside Bob Dylan and the Beatles, Buckminster Fuller and R.D. Laing as one of the ‘gurus’ of the youth movement who might just have the secret of the universe.

Based upon extensive research, this biography paints a new portrait of Burroughs, making him real to the reader and showing how he was perceived by his contemporaries in all his guises – from icily distant to voluble drunk. It shows how his writing was very much influenced by his life situation and by the people he met on his travels around America and Europe. He was, beneath it all, a man torn by emotions: his guilt at not visiting his doting mother; his despair at not responding to reconciliation attempts from his father; his distance from his brother; the huge void that separated him from his son; and above all his killing of his wife, Joan Vollmer.
William Blake vs the World

William Blake vs the World

‘A glittering stream of revelatory light . . . Fascinating’ THE TIMES
‘Rich, complex and original’ TOM HOLLAND
‘One of the best books on Blake I have ever read’ DAVID KEENAN
‘Absolutely wonderful!’ TERRY GILLIAM
‘An alchemical dream of a book’ SALENA GODDEN
‘Tells us a great deal about all human imagination’ ROBIN INCE


***

Poet, artist, visionary and author of the unofficial English national anthem ‘Jerusalem’, William Blake is an archetypal misunderstood genius. His life passed without recognition and he worked without reward, mocked, dismissed and misinterpreted. Yet from his ignoble end in a pauper’s grave, Blake now occupies a unique position as an artist who unites and attracts people from all corners of society, and a rare inclusive symbol of English identity.

Blake famously experienced visions, and it is these that shaped his attitude to politics, sex, religion, society and art. Thanks to the work of neuroscientists and psychologists, we are now in a better position to understand what was happening inside that remarkable mind, and gain a deeper appreciation of his brilliance. His timeless work, we will find, has never been more relevant.

In William Blake vs the World we return to a world of riots, revolutions and radicals, discuss movements from the Levellers of the sixteenth century to the psychedelic counterculture of the 1960s, and explore the latest discoveries in neurobiology, quantum physics and comparative religion. Taking the reader on wild detours into unfamiliar territory, John Higgs places the bewildering eccentricities of a most singular artist into context. And although the journey begins with us trying to understand him, we will ultimately discover that it is Blake who helps us to understand ourselves.
William Blake Now

William Blake Now

‘If a thing loves, it is infinite’ William Blake

A short, impassioned argument for why the visionary artist William Blake is important in the twenty-first century

The visionary poet and painter William Blake is a constant presence throughout contemporary culture – from videogames to novels, from sporting events to political rallies and from horror films to designer fashion. Although he died nearly 200 years ago, something about his work continues to haunt the twenty-first century. What is it about Blake that has so endured? In this illuminating essay, John Higgs takes us on a whirlwind tour to prove that far from being the mere New Age counterculture figure that many assume him to be, Blake is now more relevant than ever.
Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen

The definitive biography of the war poet – ‘Dominic Hibberd has probably done more more than any other individual to illuminate Owen’s life and work. His new Life is a triumph … it is difficult to believe it will ever be superseded’ Mark Bostridge, The Independent on Sunday

When Wilfred Owen died in 1918 aged 25, only five of his poems had been published. Yet he became one of the most popular poets of the 20th century. For decades his public image was controlled by family and friends, especially his brother Harold who was terrified anyone might think Wilfred was gay. In recent years much new material has become available. This book, based on over thirty years of wide-ranging research, brings new information to almost every part of Owen’s life. Owen emerges as a complex, fascinating and often endearing character with an intense delight in being alive.
Wildflower

Wildflower

A compelling story of African adventure, romance and intrigue, perfect for readers of bestselling true crime such as WHITE MISCHIEF and MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL.

WILDFLOWER is the gripping life story of the naturalist, filmmaker and lifelong conservationist Joan Root. From her passion for animals and her hard-fought crusade to save Kenya’s beautiful Lake Naivasha, to her storybook love affair, Root’s life was one of a remarkable modern-day heroine. After 20 years of spectacular, unparalleled wildlife filmmaking together, Joan and Alan Root divorced and a fascinating woman found her own voice. Renowned journalist Mark Seal has written a breathtaking portrait of a strong woman discovering herself and fighting for her beliefs before her mysterious and brutal murder in Kenya.

With a cast as wild, wondrous and unpredictable as Africa itself, WILDFLOWER is a real-life adventure tale set in the world’s disappearing wilderness. Rife with personal revelation, intrigue, corruption and murder, readers will remember Joan Root’s extraordinary journey long after they turn the last page of this compelling book.
Wild Thing

Wild Thing

‘Arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music,’ says Jimi Hendrix’s citation in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. James Marshall Hendrix remains unique as an African American who broke out of the traditional ‘Black’ genres of blues, r&b and soul to play hard rock to an overwhelmingly white audience, almost single-handedly creating what became known as heavy metal.

With unprecedented access to Jimi’s younger brother, Leon, the two most important women in his life and numerous previously untapped sources, bestselling music biographer Philip Norman resurrects the real Jimi from the almost mythical icon who has continued to influence young guitarists. His death in 1970, aged only twenty-seven when his fame was at its height, has long been rock’s greatest unsolved mystery. But finally we learn where the responsibility lay for Jimi’s lonely, squalid end.

‘An engaging memorial to a rock revolutionary whose music, in contrast to many of his revered Sixties peers, retains much of its explosively thrilling voodoo power’ The Times
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