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A State Beyond the Pale

A State Beyond the Pale

‘A State Beyond the Pale’ looks at the roots of anti-Israeli sentiment in Europe.

The Jewish state of Israel has now acquired the status of a pariah across much of the West and especially in Europe. For many, it has become the contemporary equivalent of apartheid South Africa – a system and a state with no legitimate place in the modern world. Israel’s conflict with the Palestinians and the wider Muslim world also takes place across one of the great fault lines in global politics. No-one with a serious interest in international affairs can ignore it. But why have so many people and institutions of influence in Europe chosen to place themselves on the side of that fault line which opposes Israel?

Where exactly does all this hostility come from? Can this really be put down to a revival of anti-Semitism on a continent which gave the world the Holocaust? ‘A State Beyond the Pale: Europe’s Problem with Israel’ looks at the roots of anti-Israeli sentiment in Europe and shows why there is now a risk that it may even spread to the United States. In the author’s view, the Israel-Palestine conflict can be seen as a test case for the West’s ability to stand up for the values it claims as its own. In Europe, important institutions and individuals are now failing that test. This book explains why.
Backfire

Backfire

Alan Clark’s passion for cars – that he bought, drove and wrote about over 50 years

Alan Clark was passionate about cars from an early age. He bought his first car – a secondhand 6.5 litre Bentley – while still a schoolboy at Eton and without a driving licence. By the time he was 24 he had been banned from driving three times, not only for speeding but in one instance for driving an open Buick Roadster with a girl on his lap. He dealt in ‘classic’ and vintage cars and soon built up an impressive stable of his own.

One of his first published pieces of journalism appeared in the US magazine, Road and Track, for which he was briefly UK correspondent. BACK FIRE, the title of a column he wrote in Thoroughbred and Classic Cars magazine, ran for three years until his death in September 1999. Alan Clark’s elder son, James Clark – who has inherited his father’s motoring enthusiasms – provides a Prologue; Alan Clark’s widow Jane writes a moving Afterword.
Blood and Silk

Blood and Silk

Why are Southeast Asia’s richest countries such as Malaysia riddled with corruption? Why do Myanmar, Thailand and the Philippines harbour unresolved violent insurgencies? How do deepening religious divisions in Indonesia and Malaysia, and China’s growing influence, affect the region and the rest of the world?

Thought-provoking and eye-opening, Blood and Silk is an accessible, personal look at modern Southeast Asia, written by one of the region’s most experienced outside observers. This is a first-hand account of what it’s like to sit at the table with deadly Thai Muslim insurgents, mediate between warring clans in the Southern Philippines and console the victims of political violence in Indonesia – all in an effort to negotiate peace, and understand the reasons behind endemic violence.
Celsius 7/7

Celsius 7/7

Celsius 7/7 analyses how the West’s approach to fundamentalism is destined to lead to further atrocities.

In his column which appeared in The Times on the morning of 9/11, Michael Gove prophetically argued that the West’s policy of appeasement towards terror was destined to provoke yet greater atrocities.

In CELSIUS 7/7, Gove explores the roots of Islamic rage, the historical factors which culminated in the current terrorist campaign and the Muslim world’s troubled accommodation with modernity. He also analyses the intellectual roots and political appeal of Islamism, explains the factors behind Jihadi violence and places the current fundamentalist challenge in context.

Combining a broad historical sweep with character sketches of key figures such as Michel Aflaq, Charles de Gaulle, Sayyid Qutb, Donald Rumsfeld, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, Henry Kissinger and Osama bin Laden, as well as a detailed survey of Western political failures, Gove’s account is a shrewd and detached analysis that provides powerfully convincing recommendations for future action.
Connectography

Connectography

Which lines on the map matter most?

It’s time to reimagine how life is organized on Earth. In Connectography, Parag Khanna guides us through the emerging global network civilization in which mega-cities compete over connectivity and borders are increasingly irrelevant. Travelling across the world, Khanna shows how twenty-first-century conflict is a tug-of-war over pipelines and Internet cables, advanced technologies and market access.

Yet Connectography also offers a hopeful vision of the future – beneath the chaos of a world that appears to be falling apart, a new foundation of connectivity is pulling it together.
Dangerous Friends

Dangerous Friends

Originally published as LOOKING FOR MR NOBODY

A fascinating true story of one man’s connection to the Cambridge Spy Ring and his daughter’s search for the truth.

‘A book which deserves nothing but praise’ SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

‘What makes [this book] memorable is Rees’s moving account of her own attempt to come to terms with her father’s “secret” … her poignant memoir gives a rare insight into the experiences of families whose fathers joined the ranks of “Stalin’s Englishmen”‘ SUNDAY TIMES


Since Goronwy Rees’s death, his daughter Jenny has had to cope with the frequently made allegation that her father was another of the spies recruited at Cambridge in the 1930s. He never disguised his friendship with Guy Burgess who, with Donald Maclean, had defected to Moscow in 1951, and in 1979 Rees helped Andrew Boyle unmask Anthony Blunt, the Fourth Man.

So, was Rees himself actually a spy? The opening of KGB files has acted as a spur to Jenny Rees in her quest to exorcise the past. The result is full of unexpected revelation, made all the more moving as she discovers for the first time the secret life of her father.

Previously published as LOOKING FOR MR NOBODY
Getting Our Way

Getting Our Way

A highly informed insider’s account of some of the ‘honest men’ as they sought, by fair means or foul, to get Britain its way in the world.

GETTING OUR WAY recounts nine stories from Britain’s diplomatic annals over the last five hundred years, in which the diplomats themselves are at the centre of the narrative. It is an inside account of their extraordinary experiences, sometimes in the face of physical danger, often at history’s hinge. Be it Henry Killigrew’s mission to Edinburgh in 1572, Castlereagh at the Congress of Vienna, Our Man in Washington and the Nassau Deal, or the handover of Hong Kong to China, we can see how Britain has viewed its interests in the world and sought to advance them.

Some of these dramatic episodes record triumph, some failure, but all of them illustrate how the three pillars of the national interest – security, prosperity and values – have been the foundation of British foreign policy for half a century. Each story is illuminated by colourful anecdotes and insights drawn from Christopher Meyer’s first-hand experience of international relations.

Moreover, the book is a salutary reminder that foreign policy and diplomacy begin and end with the national interest. And far from being the preserve of aloof aristocrats, the pursuit of our national interest is replete with an extraordinary combination of high principle and low cunning, vice and virtue, all with the specific aim of ‘getting our way’.
Globalising Hatred

Globalising Hatred

A hard-hitting essay combined with factual reportage on the new anti-semitism throughout Europe.

This book argues that what the 21st century now faces is an ideological assault based on hatred of Jews which is as serious as any major threat to universal values as the world has faced. Anti-semitism is the visible language and action of a deeper threat to world peace, to the achievements of the human spirit we call the Enlightenment, and undermines vital work to address problems like poverty and the challenges of the environment.

Denis MacShane’s survey of 21st century anti-semitism is based on the All-Party Commission of Enquiry which was chaired by the author in the UK. His book considers examples in Europe and how anti-semitism is now a linking mechanism between different extremisms, usually but not exclusively of the Right. It lists in detail the anti-semitism in national party politics, including the European Parliament, and it examines how Holocaust denial is not a question of liberal free-expression issues but an organised ideological position. The new anti-semitism arises from three main sources: state-sanctioned anti-semitism; that of terrorist movements like Al Qaeda; and that of political movements like the Muslim Brotherhood and its off-shoots and spokesmen.

The book is both a cri de coeur for a new tolerance and a resolution to throw light on 21st century anti-semitism, which has left Europe to become a new form of mobilising politics across many continents.
Inside The Third Reich

Inside The Third Reich

The classic eye-witness account of Nazi Germany, by Hitler’s Armaments Minister and right-hand man.

Inside the Third Reich is not only the most significant personal German account to come out of the war but the most revealing document on the Hitler phenomenon yet written. It takes the reader inside Nazi Germany on four different levels: Hitler’s inner circle, National Socialism as a whole, the area of wartime production and the inner struggle of Albert Speer. The author does not try to make excuses, even by implication, and is unrelenting toward himself and his associates … Speer’s full-length portrait of Hitler has unnerving reality. The Führer emerges as neither an incompetent nor a carpet-gnawing madman but as an evil genius of warped conceits endowed with an ineffable personal magic’ New York Times
Kim and Jim

Kim and Jim

Kim Philby’s life and career has inspired an entire literary genre: the spy novel of betrayal. He was one of the leaders of the British counter-intelligence efforts, first against the Nazis, then against the Soviet Union. He was also the KGB’s most valuable double-agent, so highly regarded that today his image is on the postage stamps of the Russian Federation.

Philby was the mentor of James Jesus Angleton, one of the central figures in the early years of the CIA who became the long-serving chief of the counter-intelligence staff of the Agency.

James Angleton and Kim Philby were friends for six years, or so Angleton thought. They were then enemies for the rest of their lives. This is the story of their intertwined careers and a betrayal that would have dramatic and irrevocable effects on the Cold War and US-Soviet relations. Featuring vivid locations in London, Washington DC, Rome and Istanbul, KIM AND JIM anatomises one of the most important and flawed personal relationships in modern history.
Move

Move

Where will you live in 2030? Where will your children settle in 2040? What will the map of humanity look like in 2050?

In the 60,000 years since people began colonising the continents, a recurring feature of human civilisation has been mobility the constant search for resources and stability. Seismic global events – wars and genocides, revolutions and pandemics – have only accelerated the process. The map of humanity isn’t settled, not now, not ever.

As climate change tips toward full-blown crisis, economies collapse, governments destabilise and technology disrupts, we’re entering a new age of mass migrations – one that will scatter both the dispossessed and the well-off. Which areas will people abandon and where will they resettle? Which countries will accept or reject them? As today’s world population, which includes four billion restless youth, votes with their feet, what map of human geography will emerge?

Here global strategy advisor Parag Khanna provides an illuminating and authoritative vision of the next phase of human civilisation – one that is both mobile and sustainable. As the book explores, in the years ahead people will move to where the resources are and technologies will flow to the people who need them, returning us to our nomadic roots while building more secure habitats. Move is a fascinating look at the deep trends that are shaping the most likely scenarios for the future. Most importantly, it guides each of us as we determine our optimal location on humanity’s ever-changing map.
Political Risk

Political Risk

Political risk – the probability that a political action could significantly affect an organisation – is changing fast, and it’s more widespread than ever before.

In the past, the chief concern used to be whether a foreign dictator would nationalise the country’s oil industry. Today, political risk stems from a widening array of agents, from Twitter users and terrorists to hackers and insurgents. What’s more, the very institutions and laws that are supposed to reduce uncertainty and risk often increase it instead. This means that in today’s globalised world there are no ‘safe’ bets. Political risk affects companies and organisations of all sizes, operating everywhere from London to Lahore, even if they don’t know it.

Political Risk investigates and analyses this shifting landscape, suggests what businesses can do to navigate it, and explains how all of us can better understand these rapidly changing geopolitical dynamics.
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